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on 17 November 2017

WHO is recommending that farmers and the food industry stop using antibiotics routinely to promote growth and prevent disease in healthy animals. The new WHO recommendations aim to help preserve the effectiveness of antibiotics that are important for human medicine by reducing their unnecessary use in animals. In some countries, approximately 80% of total consumption of medically important antibiotics is in the animal sector, largely for growth promotion in healthy animals. Over-use and misuse of antibiotics in animals and humans is contributing to the rising threat of antibiotic resistance. Some types of bacteria that cause serious infections in humans have already developed resistance to most or all of the available treatments, and there are very few promising options in the research pipeline. (who.int)

on 03 November 2017

New York’s Elmhurst Dairy first made headlines back in 2016 after a dramatic change in business saw the end of cow milk production in favour of creating plant based beverages. This courageous move followed 92 years of dairy manufacturing, and was driven by CEO Henry Schwartz. “After 92 years in business, it was time to embrace a new model and look toward the future,” said Schwartz, aged 82. Leading the way with their innovative new products, Elmhurt’s product manager, Kimberly Behzadi said: “Our team, led by our CEO Henry Schwartz and renowned food scientist and entrepreneur Dr. Cheryl Mitchell, have developed a patented technology (called “milking”) that successfully harnesses the nutrition of almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts and cashews without the need for stabilizers or other additives.” Schwartz added: “The plant-based milk category has exploded in recent years; people have discovered that this alternative to milk satisfies their dairy desire and can provide nutritional benefits.”.

on 27 October 2017

All 1,200 schools in the New York City public school district will offer at least one vegan entrée at the beginning of this school year. Students will now be able to choose hummus for lunch, with several schools adding more creative vegan options such as Mexicali Chili, Lentil Stew, Lentil Sloppy Joes, Braised Black Beans with Plantains, and Zesty BBQ Crunchy Tofu. The Coalition for Healthy School Food (CHSF) is behind the new initiative and, to date, has worked with the city’s department of education to help three NYC schools—Active Learning Elementary School in Queens (PS244), Peck Slip School in Manhattan (PS343), and The Bergen Elementary School (PS1) in Brooklyn—to transition to an all-vegetarian menu. PS1 Principal Arlene Ramos revealed that students asked for healthier, meatless options and that she is proud to be able to introduce the new menu. (vegnews.com)

on 20 October 2017

Hollywood actor and passionate animal rights advocate Natalie Portman recently took to the stage at the Environmental Media Association awards after receiving recognition for her ongoing commitment to sustainability. In the speech, Portman opens up about why she is vegan and how it relates to creating a more environmentally friendly future. “Factory farming is responsible for most of the air, water [and] land pollution that disproportionately affects our poorer communities” She explains, before stating to the crowd that “we get to make decisions three times a day [about] what we do with our planet and can make a difference by even once a day or once a week choosing not to eat animals or animal products”. Vegetarian since childhood, Natalie says she has been following a vegan diet for over 6 years and that it has been an incredible influence in her life. Portman’s new film ‘Eating Animals’ had its world premiere at the Telluride Film Festival earlier this year and is based on the book that inspired her to adopt a vegan diet; also named Eating Animals. The documentary takes an in-depth look at the realities of modern-day factory farming and the methods used to mass produce meat, dairy, and eggs. (livekindly.co)

on 13 October 2017

The Flemish Institute for Healthy Living recently reinvented the traditional food pyramid to encourage Belgian citizens to consume more healthful foods. The new pyramid is inverted, with the top (and largest) sector dedicated to foods such as tofu, grains, fruit, and vegetables—a nutritional category the institute urges citizens to consume the most. Butter and steak appear at the bottom of the pyramid, while salami, bacon, and other processed foods are relegated to a circle outside of the pyramid in a red category created to discourage consumption. In regard to animal products, a representative of the institute told local media outlet Flanders Today that “we want to make it clear that we don’t need these products,” adding, “We don’t forbid them, but they should be rather an exception than rule.” (vegnews.com)