Powered byInfoNET

on 29 December 2017

A commercial entitled “Hope, Not Hell” debuted this month in theaters across the United Kingdom, and currently runs before blockbuster films such as Star Wars, Pitch Perfect 3, and Murder On The Orient Express. The commercial was created by UK-based vegan nonprofit Viva! and features rescued pig Hope and her piglets experiencing freedom for the first time, syncing up her “dance of joy” to harrowing footage from factory farms. “We contrast her freedom with her sisters and brothers inside factory farms,” Viva founder Juliet Gellatley said, “so it is incredibly poignant.” The advertisement was created using £102,000 ($136,393) that the nonprofit received from crowdfunding. “In a world inundated by advertising,” Gellatley said, “it takes something unique to make people stop and listen. Hope’s rescue has given us the opportunity to do just that.” The advertisement, which runs until January 4, has the potential to reach more than two million movie-goers this holiday season. (vegnews.com)

on 22 December 2017

In a recent interview with JOE.ie, Ireland’s premier men’s lifestyle website, Daisy Ridley—who plays the lead character “Rey” in the brand new film, Star Wars: The Last Jedi—revealed she is vegan. During the film’s production tour, Ridley stopped by Los Angeles eatery Mr. Chow, stating, “Someone did a great order—I’m vegan!—[they] did a great order for me. It was delicious.” Ridley is also the human companion to a special needs rescue dog, Muffin, who is blind and deaf. The actress’ announcement that she is vegan follows recent headlines pointing to a very vegan moment in the blockbuster film, in which Chewbacca—the fluffy Star Wars icon—refuses to eat a chicken-like carcass after connecting it to his wide-eyed Porg alien animal friends. (vegnews.com)

on 15 December 2017

New data released this week by Ireland’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reveals the major role of the dairy industry in growing greenhouse gas emissions. The figures show that the country emitted 61.19 million tons of carbon dioxide in 2016, which represents a 3.5 percent increase from 2015. In the previous four years, the number of dairy cows in Ireland has increased by 22 percent, and greenhouse-gas emissions have subsequently increased by eight percent during that time. Every nation in the world—excluding the United States—is currently working to “decarbonize” (or reduce greenhouse gas emissions) in order to fight global climate change under The Paris Agreement. Eimear Cotter, director of the EPA’s Office of Environmental Sustainability, said that the growing dairy industry is a major hindrance to the country’s ability to meet its climate change goals. “The growth in this sector,” Cotter said, “particularly for dairy and other cattle, points to very significant risks in relation to meeting our decarbonization objectives.” (vegnews.com)

on 08 December 2017

On the occasion of International Animal Rights Day on Dec 9th, 2017, hundreds of people will march through the center of Zagreb to bring attention to the injustice that happens to animals every day. The long and loud march will start at 11 A.M. on Trg kralja Tomislava, calling everyone to take a stand for a better, more humane, and just world for all animal species. It will be the call for those who cannot speak for themselves – for all cows, pigs, dogs, chicken, cats, fish and other animal species tortured and killed in the food industry, fashion industry, laboratories,  and entertainment industry. In other words, for all animals exploited by humans. With the support of drummers, many friends of animals will walk with banners, signs, flags and whistles to join their voices into one, demanding the right to life without oppression and slavery as an undeniable right for all. Participants from Zagreb, Osijek and other Croatian towns will join the march. International support is expected too. The march will start at Trga Kralja Tomislava and follow the route Park Josipa Jurja Strossmayera, Zrinjevac, Teslina, Masarykova, Frankopanska Street and Ilica. After 12 noon the marchers will arrive at Trg bana Jelacica where they will pause before continuing down Jurisiceva Street to their final destination at Trg hrvatskih velikana.

on 24 November 2017

A new survey shows that 47 percent of adults in the United States support closing all slaughterhouses, while 69 percent identify animal agriculture as a top social issue worldwide. A new survey conducted by nonprofit think tank Sentience Institute (SI)—in partnership with research firm Ipsos Group—found that Americans are supportive of banning all animal slaughterhouses. This October, a group of 1,094 adults were asked several survey questions related to factory farming, and 47 percent supported banning slaughterhouses, 33 percent supported banning all animal farming, and 69 percent identified animal agriculture as one of the most important social issues in the world today. The survey further revealed a disconnect between public perception and reality in terms of the pervasiveness of factory farms in the United States. While government census data shows that only one percent of animals live on non-factory farms, 75 percent of survey participants believed they consumed only humanely-raised animals. "This suggests a "psychological refuge" effect," SI Research Director Jacy Reese said, "where we justify our animal product consumption by incorrectly assuming we eat ethically-produced food. This allows us to navigate the cognitive dissonance that comes from caring about animals while still eating food from factory farms." SI plans to conduct similar surveys in coming years to ascertain the shifting public attitudes toward animal agriculture as the plant-based food sector continues to grow and new technologies—such as "clean" meat, or animal cells grown into meat in a lab-setting—become more readily available.