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on 11 March 2018

Animal rights activists and former Baywatch star Pamela Anderson has urged an Australian prison boss to serve vegan meals in a bid to reduce violence in correctional facilities. Anderson wrote to New South Wales Corrective Services Commissioner Peter Severin with her request. Writing in her capacity as Honorary Director of animal rights charity PETA, Anderson said: "I read about your plan to rehabilitate female inmates through mindfulness exercises and yoga and wanted to make a suggestion that could further help embrace nonviolence, switching to nutritious vegan meals in your correctional facilities. "Not only would providing vegan food honor one of the driving principles of yoga - ahimsa (doing no harm) - by sparing animals lives, it could also help improve the health of the women in your facilities while decreasing long-term healthcare costs." She wrote: "Maricopa County Jail switched to all-vegetarian food for its 8,000 inmates and reported a saving of US$273,000.

on 01 March 2018

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Ghent found that the United Kingdom would save £5.21 billion ($7.35 billion) in economic costs during the next 20 years if 10 percent of the population adopted a plant-based diet. Researchers studied the health benefits attributed to plant-based diets across a number of scientific studies and found that if 10 percent of the UK population incorporated soy-based foods into their daily diets, the economic savings would amount to £7.54 billion ($10.63 billion). “Our research demonstrates that increasing plant-based eating is cost-effective, reduces economic costs, such as hospital admissions and doctors' bills, as well as increasing the number of healthy years people live, and enabling them to continue having an active life," lead study author Lieven Annemans said. "Our study has the potential to contribute to the way healthy eating is promoted.” While scientists continue to prove that plant-based diets are optimal for health, mounting research links the consumption of animal products to increased risks for developing diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer. (vegnews.com)

on 23 February 2018

According to local media outlet Newstalk ZB (NTZB), New Zealand residents are consuming 20 kilos (44 pounds) less meat per capita than they did 10 years ago. NTZB spoke with local butcher shop owner Hannah Miller who confirmed that sales at her shop Lady Butcher have declined in recent years as consumers are increasingly buying smaller portions. Other regions around the world have also reported a decline in both meat consumption and production. According to market data gathered by research firm Kantar World Panel (KWP), 29 percent of United Kingdom residents consumed a meat-free dinner in 2017. On the production side, the German meat industry produced approximately 340 million pounds less meat in 2017 in response to decreased demand for animal products. (vegnews.com)

on 16 February 2018

A resolution introduced in the California State Legislature by Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens), urges the Office of Environment Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) to add processed meat, such as hot dogs, bacon, and deli meat, to California’s list of substances known to cause cancer. Companies that sell products associated with these listed substances, either in combination with unlisted substances or alone, in California must provide “clear and reasonable” warnings on the label to inform consumers about the risk. A 2015 World Health Organization report classified processed meat, including pepperoni, ham, and sausage made from pork, beef, or poultry as a Group 1 carcinogen. Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in California. (pcrm.org)

on 08 February 2018

Giant egg company Cal-Maine Foods’ CEO says vegan alternatives are responsible for the company’s first big loss of profits in over a decade. Large egg company Cal-Maine Foods (CMF) released its earnings report for 2017, and the numbers looked dire. For the first time in over one decade, the company reported a loss of $74.3 million for the last fiscal year. CMF’s CEO Adolphus (“Dolph”) Baker attributed the dramatic decline to the growth of the egg alternatives industry, which includes vegan-friendly items such as flax, tofu, and prepared products that contain potato starch and tapioca. In 2015, the avian flu swept across chickens exploited in the egg industry, causing many egg suppliers to mass-slaughter birds. During that time, egg-free mayonnaise Just Mayo by Hampton Creek rose in popularity in the retail segment—becoming the only mayonnaise used in prepared sandwiches by chain convenience store 7-Eleven—and in the foodservice industry via Compass Group (a leading food supplier of school and office cafeterias nationwide). (bloomsmag.com)