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Green Monday for a Great Week!

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All Green Monday recipes are meatless and vegan...
Tasty, healthy, versatile, they will help you feel good and pleased with yourself.

 

Enjoy!

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Make Every Day Your Green Monday

Health
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Ecology
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Ethics
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A new food index launched last week by investor network Farm Animal Investment Risk & Return (FAIRR)—which manages $5.9 trillion in assets, collectively—estimates the majority of meat, fish, and dairy corporations are impeding global environmental goals. The group scored 60 of the world’s largest animal agriculture companies—totalling $152 billion in market capital—and classified 36, including suppliers of McDonald’s and KFC, as “high risk” investments after assessing criteria such as greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity loss, water management, and antibiotic use. FAIRR’s research, which aims to provide investors with a higher level of transparency, shows the companies are failing to address or disclose basic management across critical risks.

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At least one-third of early deaths could be prevented if everyone moved to a vegetarian diet, Harvard scientists have calculated. Dr Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard Medical School said the benefits of a plant-based diet had been vastly underestimated. Recent figures from the Office for National Statistics suggested that around 24 per cent or 141,000 deaths each year in Britain were preventable,  but most of that was due to smoking, alcohol or obesity. But the new figures from Harvard suggest that at least 200,000 lives could be saved each year if people cut meat from their diets.

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In recent years, egg production has been in the spotlight for animal welfare issues. While the number of European farms with free-range hens has increased, in Spain, 93 percent of laying hens are still caged. This also contributes to the industry's environmental burden. In the rest of the EU, the figure is much lower (40 percent) due to a growing concern for animal welfare. A team of Spanish scientists has reported the environmental cost of egg production in a typical farm in Spain. The scientists of the University of Oviedo analyzed the effect of intensive egg production on 18 environmental categories, among which are ozone depletion, climate change, terrestrial acidification, human toxicity and land occupation, among others.

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